Consumerization Talks – Sharing the Stewardship of Mobile Data

An interview with Philippe Winthrop

Managing Director
The Enterprise Mobility Foundation

 

 

 

According to Gartner, the consumerization of IT is the most significant trend affecting the IT Industry in the next ten years. As the Managing Director of The Enterprise Mobility Foundation, how would you describe the impact that this trend is having on the members of your organization?

Your IT department, like IT functions everywhere, is charged with managing corporate applications, preserving the security of your company’s lifeblood, and complying with government and industry regulations. Meanwhile, a torrent of mobile devices, neither issued nor owned by the organization, is pouring down on you. Don’t feel alone. The BYOD storm has been raging for two years, and you would be surprised how many companies are struggling to put a strategy in place to manage it. For example, an enormous bank—whose name and geography I can’t disclose—is still thinking about PIN functionality and email and calendaring, rather than application development and management. In this mobile conundrum, they and many other companies are only looking to their IT department for direction.

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Consumerization 101 – Employee Privacy Vs. Corporate Liability

Three pitfalls your BYOD program can’t afford to ignore.


Mary D. joined MD&M Inc. in 2009. Being an Apple enthusiast, she was quite excited to learn that the company offered an innovative BYOD program that allows employees to use their own iPhone for work. As part of the new hire package, Mary signed the acceptable use policy and was granted access to corporate email on the go.

Mary’s started having performance problems in her second year, and her manager put her on notice. After six months, Mary was terminated. When her manager clicked the ‘terminate’ button within the company’s HR system, a series of automated tasks were initiated, including the remote wipe of all information on Mary’s iPhone.

As it turned out, Mary had been performing poorly because her son John was dying of cancer. Just a few weeks before Mary was terminated, her husband took a picture of her and his son using Mary’s iPhone. It was the last photo Mary had of her son, and MD&M Inc. unknowingly destroyed it. Mary sued the company for damages.

Just how much is the last photo of a mother and son worth? Attorneys and expert witnesses sought to answer that question. They arrived at $5 million.

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Talking with the first Director of Consumerization

My interview with Dan Raywood, Online News Editor, SC Magazine.

http://www.scmagazineuk.com/talking-with-the-first-senior-director-of-consumerisation/article/212901/

Talking with the first senior director of consumerisation
Dan Raywood – SC Magazine
September 27 2011

It is almost a year since I was told that 2011 would be the year of consumerisation, and I recently met one executive who has been gifted with managing the challenge.

Ever since I was introduced to the concept of the ‘consumerisation of IT’ (to give it its full title), I have been given opinion, perspective, research and solutions to address and mitigate the problem.

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Trend Micro Consumerization Report 2011

An increasing number of organizations take a strategic approach to Consumerization by providing IT support for personal devices and by deploying new IT tools to secure and manage them.


This online survey was conducted in June 2011 in the U.S., Germany and Japan among IT personnel responsible for endpoint operational management and/or messaging and collaboration operations. Respondents needed to be part of an organization with at least 500 employees worldwide. A total of 600 surveys were collected equally distributed across countries and industry verticals.

Consumerization reaches the tipping point

Data shows that the majority of companies surveyed already allow employees to use their personal devices for work-related activities. On an aggregate, 56% of the

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‘Trend Micro Consumerization Report 2011’ revealed at the Gartner Summit in London

MEDIA ALERT: Cesare Garlati, Senior Director of Consumerization at Trend Micro, to reveal findings of the ‘Trend Micro Consumerization Report 2011’ at the Gartner Security & Risk Management Summit in London


“Rather than resist it, organisations should embrace Consumerization to unlock its business potential. This requires a strategic approach, flexible policies and appropriate security and management tools.”

Speaking at the Gartner Security & Risk Management Summit in London on 19 September 2011, Cesare Garlati, Senior Director of Consumerization at Trend Micro, will be speaking about what Gartner consider the single most influential technology trend of this decade: the Consumerization of IT. Or, how private technology use by employees is becoming increasingly embedded in their business activities and working practices.

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Embrace Consumerization in the Enterprise

Fireside Chat with Ty Smallwood, Chief Security Officer, Medical Center of Central Georgia – Gartner Security Summit 2011, Washington DC.


According to Gartner, the consumerization of IT is the most significant trend affecting the IT Industry in the next ten years. As the Security Officer of one of the largest health care organizations in the U.S., how do you feel about this trend? How is it affecting your organization?

There has definitely been an impact on the organization, both from a policy process and procedure perspective. The cost to accommodate consumerization is always a factor.

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Embrace Consumerization. Unlock Opportunity.

This blog post is based on my talk at the annual “IDC Asia/Pacific CIO Summit” held last July 28, 2011 in Singapore.


The world of enterprise IT is going through lot of changes right now. One of the most important trends that’s causing these changes is consumerization.

Now, what is consumerization? Simply put, it’s the trend wherein employees use their own personal IT devices for work. The most obvious consumerization devices are smartphones. More and more smartphones are being sold to consumers today. In fact, 92 million computers were sold in the last quarter of 2010 but more than 100 million smartphones were sold within the same time frame.

These devices are ending up in the hands of tech-savvy users who have never known a world without the Internet… or a world without immediate connectivity and access. Businesses are going to have to make some real adjustments to lure this new wave of talents and that’s going to require offering them more choices than traditional, standard-issue office laptops.

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Consumerization Talks with Ken Dulaney, VP Gartner Research

“This is the fashion business, not the PC business … most of our clients today say if they were to have an auditor come in and audit them across all the technologies in use, that they would fail.”


The consumerization of IT will be the single most influential technology trend of this decade, says Gartner, and companies are already well aware of it as the wrestle with the growing influence of smartphones, tablets, social media, and on and on. And while this growth does bring risks, too many companies make the mistake of trying to stop all together the influx of consumer IT. What potential benefits can the consumerization of IT yield for your organization? Why is a strategic approach an imperative for attaining those benefits? And what risks will you have to contend with? Below is an excerpt of my recent conversation with Ken Dulaney, Vice President and distinguished analyst in Gartner Research. Ken answers these questions, and more importantly, reveals the solutions and best practices  to turn consumerization into a competitive advantage.

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Consumerization of Enterprise Mobility

The lack of a strategic approach to the Consumerization of Enterprise Mobility creates security risks, financial exposure and a management nightmare for IT.

Employees around the globe are increasingly becoming more mobile as wireless devices and mobile data networks become ubiquitous, simple to use and affordable. The business benefits of extending enterprise data and applications to mobile workers are already apparent. These benefits include higher productivity, higher customer satisfaction and higher talent retention, to name just a few. Many recent studies from Gartner, IDC, Forrester and others point out that almost half of the U.S. workforce is already mobile and away from the primary work location for more than 20% of the time. Typologies of mobile workers may include road warriors, field workers, day extenders – checking email from home before going to the office, business travelers, tele-workers and so on. In fact, it is probably fair to say that every worker is already an occasional mobile worker as the traditional boundaries of the office have blurred into homes, hotels, conference centers, airports, busses, trains, airplanes and many other commercial venues such as coffee shops and malls.

Increasingly, a company’s ability to compete depends on enabling these mobile workers so they can be productive wherever they are. However, this is much easier to say than to do. Enterprise mobility comes with its own unique blend of strategic and operational challenges:

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