Mobility Management and Security. A Customer Panel.

Learn from a panel of industry peers the solutions and the best practices that have turned consumer mobile technology into a competitive advantage for their companies.

This post is based on the recording of the panel that I moderated at the IDC mobileNext Forum in December 2011 in San Francisco.

Eric Erickson
VP Information Systems
Liberty First Credit Union

Bill Troyak
Team Leader End User Devices
Navistar

Jeff Jackson
Partner
Acumen Technologies

I’d like to start by asking the panelists to briefly introduce themselves and the size and scope of their BYOD programs.

Eric: My name is Eric Erickson. I have been at Liberty First Credit Union for seven years as the VP of Information Systems and in the technology field for almost 25 years, 17 of those years with financial institutions. Our mission is to provide security for our members and provide our staff with the tools that they need to be able to work with the members to be able to get their accounts opened in a timely fashion or to get the documents that they need. We are looking to the mobile device to be able to move beyond our physical location so that we can go out to the community and work with the members where it’s convenient for them.

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Consumerization Talks – Sharing the Stewardship of Mobile Data

An interview with Philippe Winthrop

Managing Director
The Enterprise Mobility Foundation

 

 

 

According to Gartner, the consumerization of IT is the most significant trend affecting the IT Industry in the next ten years. As the Managing Director of The Enterprise Mobility Foundation, how would you describe the impact that this trend is having on the members of your organization?

Your IT department, like IT functions everywhere, is charged with managing corporate applications, preserving the security of your company’s lifeblood, and complying with government and industry regulations. Meanwhile, a torrent of mobile devices, neither issued nor owned by the organization, is pouring down on you. Don’t feel alone. The BYOD storm has been raging for two years, and you would be surprised how many companies are struggling to put a strategy in place to manage it. For example, an enormous bank—whose name and geography I can’t disclose—is still thinking about PIN functionality and email and calendaring, rather than application development and management. In this mobile conundrum, they and many other companies are only looking to their IT department for direction.

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Consumerization 101 – Employee Privacy Vs. Corporate Liability

Three pitfalls your BYOD program can’t afford to ignore.


Mary D. joined MD&M Inc. in 2009. Being an Apple enthusiast, she was quite excited to learn that the company offered an innovative BYOD program that allows employees to use their own iPhone for work. As part of the new hire package, Mary signed the acceptable use policy and was granted access to corporate email on the go.

Mary’s started having performance problems in her second year, and her manager put her on notice. After six months, Mary was terminated. When her manager clicked the ‘terminate’ button within the company’s HR system, a series of automated tasks were initiated, including the remote wipe of all information on Mary’s iPhone.

As it turned out, Mary had been performing poorly because her son John was dying of cancer. Just a few weeks before Mary was terminated, her husband took a picture of her and his son using Mary’s iPhone. It was the last photo Mary had of her son, and MD&M Inc. unknowingly destroyed it. Mary sued the company for damages.

Just how much is the last photo of a mother and son worth? Attorneys and expert witnesses sought to answer that question. They arrived at $5 million.

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MDM not the only avenue to BYOD security. But technology is simply not there yet.

My reply to Steven Song’s post on Cisco Security Blog

http://blogs.cisco.com/security/mdm-not-the-only-avenue-to-byod-security/

Yes. Mobile virtualization is the way to go. In an increasingly Consumerized IT world however, meeting end-user expectations in terms of convenience, cost and usability is even more important than addressing corporate IT professionals’ concerns about security and manageability. Despite a few remarkable attempts by VMware, Citrix and WISE, technology is simply not there yet.

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Consumerization and Mobile Security

How to bypass the iPad password in 5 second

*** UPDATED AS OF 11/14/2011: I can confirm that Apple has fixed this security flaw in iOS 5.0.1 (9A405) ***

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZPHDm88-HAc

Watch how to crack the iPad password in 5 secondsThe consumerization of IT is the single most influential technology trend of this decade. Companies are already well aware of it, as they wrestle with the growing influence of smartphones, tablets, Facebook, Twitter, Dropbox and on and on. While this growth does bring business value, too many companies make the mistake to trust consumer technology with corporate sensitive data without deploying appropriate enterprise-grade infrastructure to secure and manage it. Consumer technology is sexy, convenient and easy to use. When it comes to security and data protection however, consumer technology still has a long way to go. Security and data protection in fact remain top concerns among IT professionals – see The Consumerization Report 2011.

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Talking with the first Director of Consumerization

My interview with Dan Raywood, Online News Editor, SC Magazine.

http://www.scmagazineuk.com/talking-with-the-first-senior-director-of-consumerisation/article/212901/

Talking with the first senior director of consumerisation
Dan Raywood – SC Magazine
September 27 2011

It is almost a year since I was told that 2011 would be the year of consumerisation, and I recently met one executive who has been gifted with managing the challenge.

Ever since I was introduced to the concept of the ‘consumerisation of IT’ (to give it its full title), I have been given opinion, perspective, research and solutions to address and mitigate the problem.

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Embrace Consumerization in the Enterprise

Fireside Chat with Ty Smallwood, Chief Security Officer, Medical Center of Central Georgia – Gartner Security Summit 2011, Washington DC.


According to Gartner, the consumerization of IT is the most significant trend affecting the IT Industry in the next ten years. As the Security Officer of one of the largest health care organizations in the U.S., how do you feel about this trend? How is it affecting your organization?

There has definitely been an impact on the organization, both from a policy process and procedure perspective. The cost to accommodate consumerization is always a factor.

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Embrace Consumerization. Unlock Opportunity.

This blog post is based on my talk at the annual “IDC Asia/Pacific CIO Summit” held last July 28, 2011 in Singapore.


The world of enterprise IT is going through lot of changes right now. One of the most important trends that’s causing these changes is consumerization.

Now, what is consumerization? Simply put, it’s the trend wherein employees use their own personal IT devices for work. The most obvious consumerization devices are smartphones. More and more smartphones are being sold to consumers today. In fact, 92 million computers were sold in the last quarter of 2010 but more than 100 million smartphones were sold within the same time frame.

These devices are ending up in the hands of tech-savvy users who have never known a world without the Internet… or a world without immediate connectivity and access. Businesses are going to have to make some real adjustments to lure this new wave of talents and that’s going to require offering them more choices than traditional, standard-issue office laptops.

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There is a bug in my Apple – Part 2

Intego announces first-ever iPhone malware scanner – really?

July 12, 2011 11:49 AM ET Gregg Keizer – COMPUTERWORLD

http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9218339/Mac_security_firm_ships_first_ever_iPhone_malware_scanner

Follow up on my previous post on the new security flaw discovered in Apple’s iPhone and iPad – see https://bringyourownit.com/2011/07/07/oops-there-is-a-bug-in-my-apple/

With impeccable timing, this morning Intego announded the availability of the “first-ever iPhone malware scanner”. Sure enough I went to the Apple Store and downloaded the VirusBarrier app in my iPhone and iPad. My test drive impressions: the app still leaves to the end user the responsibility to check the attachments rather than enforcing it. It is quite clunky and may provide a false sense of security: if you tap the attachment and then release the finger a little too early, you’ll end up opening up the attachment instead of scanning it(!) Probably safer – and cheaper – not to open pdf attachment in general. And as any other consumer app, there is no centralized IT management whatsoever: no reporting and no policy enforcement. One more thing: Apple is supposedly working with Adobe to address this vulnerability and will provide an update soon. At that point this app may become simply useless … but I guess this is one of those situations where “something is better than nothing” …

A few comments from a couple of Trend Micro’s experts:

Mark Bloom, Director – Director Product Marketing @ Trend Micro : “Usage or not, they [Intego] will get a lot of brand awareness out of this…..just for that value, it was worth the development effort.”

Patrick Wheeler, Sr Product Marketing Manager @ Trend Micro : “[… Apple iOS] antimalware matters, which puts us [Trend Micro] at an advantage over MDM-only vendors like MobileIron, Airwatch, and Symantec, and allows us to talk up the differentiation for our own antimalware we get from integration with SPN.”

Oops … there is a bug in my Apple!

The new security hole found in iPhones and iPads reminds us that no platform is immune to security threats and that there is in fact a need for mobile security software for Apple products.

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052702303365804576431541102701136.html

Not so secure after allHere we go. As it turns out Apple mobile operating system is not so secure after all. While it is common perception that iPhones and iPads are so secure that they don’t even need antimalware software, the reality is that any piece of software is potentially defective and therefore vulnerable to attacks. And Apple is no exception as shown by the recent discovery of a new security flaw affecting Apple’s best selling devices. Even worse, previously discovered security issues in iOS were limited to a minority of jail-broken devices, where end users deliberately patch the standard operating system to escape Apple’s suffocating control on device and apps – see my beer side chat on YouTube at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZjbqI2V18sY.

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