(Not so) Random Musings from RSA Conference 2017

The world’s great and good of the information security industry descended on San Francisco this week for RSA Conference 2017. On the surface, it looked like more of the same this year.  There weren’t a huge amount of new companies exhibiting this year and the traditional vendors all seemed to be consolidating and streamlining their product lines in attempt to demystify buyers.  It even saw the McAfee brand back this year after a noticeable absence in the previous “Intel Security” era.

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The Data Breach Pandemic: Information Security is Broken

Verizon Data Breach Report 2015Have enterprises basically just given up on IT security? Global budgets fell by 4% in 2014 over the previous year and as a percentage of total IT budget they’ve remained at 4% or less for the past five years. The picture is even starker for firms with revenues of less than $100m, who claim to have reduced security budgets 20% since 2013.

Yet the threats keep on escalating. When it comes to information security, there are really only two situations out there: companies that have been breached, and companies that still don’t know it.

If 2014 was the “Year of the Data Breach” then 2015 is proving to be at least its equal. This month alone we’ve seen TV stations shunted off air by pro-jihadi cyber terrorists; the discovery of major new state-backed attack groups; and another massive data breach at a US healthcare provider.

We talk today about managing risk, rather than providing 100% security – because there’s no such thing. The conclusion I have reached is that the traditional information security model is broken. But why? And how can we fix it?

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The GitHub attack – is the worst still to come?

What we can learn from the recent cyber attack to the popular website GitHub and why we should worry about what is likely to come next.

 

TTL analysis performed by Netresec in SwedenOver the last few days the popular website GitHub has been the target of a massive Distributed Denial Of Service attack – DDoS, apparently originated from China. As I write this note, the GitHub status webpage now indicates “Everything operating normally” and “All systems reporting at 100%”. However, I am afraid the story is far from over and the worst may still be to come.

GitHub is the largest and most popular repository of open source projects and a key infrastructure website for the Internet. Among other, GitHub hosts the Linux project – arguably the world’s most widespread open source software. Various flavors of Linux power most of the Internet servers and an ever-increasing number of consumer devices across the globe.

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European Data Protection Reform – How to minimize impact and costs

European Data Protection ReformIf your company touches any Europeans’ data you’d better prepare for what’s coming.


The EU data protection reform is steadily moving forward. On March 12, 2014, the European Parliament adopted the current proposal in its first reading. The new regulation is intended to strengthen consumer privacy rights and to boost Europe’s digital economy. However, many experts across the Atlantic have expressed deep concerns with regard to some controversial aspects of the incoming laws, which introduce bigger fines, 24 hour disclosure and the enforced Data Privacy Officer. The proposed regulation applies to the processing of personal data pertaining to data subjects in the EU even if the controller or processor of such data is not established in the EU. U.S. companies with or without operations in the EU that fail to comply with the new rules can trigger fines up to €100 million. If your company touches any Europeans’ data, you’d better prepare for what’s coming and know what to do to minimize the impact on your organization when the regulation is enforced.

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European Data Protection Reform – How to prepare for what is coming

European Data Protection ReformIf your company touches any Europeans’ data you’d better prepare for what’s coming.


The EU data protection reform is steadily moving forward. On March 12, 2014, the European Parliament adopted the current proposal in its first reading. The new regulation is intended to strengthen consumer privacy rights and to boost Europe’s digital economy. However, many experts across the Atlantic have expressed deep concerns with regard to some controversial aspects of the incoming laws, which introduce bigger fines, 24 hour disclosure and the enforced Data Privacy Officer. The proposed regulation applies to the processing of personal data pertaining to data subjects in the EU even if the controller or processor of such data is not established in the EU. U.S. companies with or without operations in the EU that fail to comply with the new rules can trigger fines up to €100 million. If your company touches any Europeans’ data, you’d better prepare for what’s coming and know what to do to minimize the impact on your organization when the regulation is enforced.

How to prepare for what is coming

U.S. companies who market goods and services to European consumers should not wait for the regulation to enter into force. You should act promptly to avoid the disruptions and the liability resulting from an untimely implementation of these new rules.

At a minimum, your checklist should include: Read more of this post

European Data Protection Reform – Should you worry yet?

European Data Protection ReformIf your company touches any Europeans’ data you’d better prepare for what’s coming.


The EU data protection reform is steadily moving forward. On March 12, 2014, the European Parliament adopted the current proposal in its first reading. The new regulation is intended to strengthen consumer privacy rights and to boost Europe’s digital economy. However, many experts across the Atlantic have expressed deep concerns with regard to some controversial aspects of the incoming laws, which introduce bigger fines, 24 hour disclosure and the enforced Data Privacy Officer. The proposed regulation applies to the processing of personal data pertaining to data subjects in the EU even if the controller or processor of such data is not established in the EU. U.S. companies with or without operations in the EU that fail to comply with the new rules can trigger fines up to €100 million. If your company touches any Europeans’ data, you’d better prepare for what’s coming and know what to do to minimize the impact on your organization when the regulation is enforced.

 

Should you worry yet?

According to Viviane Reding, EU Justice Commissioner, there is a full commitment of the European bodies to pass this legislation by the end of the year. However, the experts are skeptical with regard to a swift approval by the council of ministers of the EU member states. Read more of this post

European Data Protection Reform – The Enforced Data Privacy Officer

European Data Protection ReformIf your company touches any Europeans’ data you’d better prepare for what’s coming.


The EU data protection reform is steadily moving forward. On March 12, 2014, the European Parliament adopted the current proposal in its first reading. The new regulation is intended to strengthen consumer privacy rights and to boost Europe’s digital economy. However, many experts across the Atlantic have expressed deep concerns with regard to some controversial aspects of the incoming laws, which introduce bigger fines, 24 hour disclosure and the enforced Data Privacy Officer. The proposed regulation applies to the processing of personal data pertaining to data subjects in the EU even if the controller or processor of such data is not established in the EU. U.S. companies with or without operations in the EU that fail to comply with the new rules can trigger fines up to €100 million. If your company touches any Europeans’ data, you’d better prepare for what’s coming and know what to do to minimize the impact on your organization when the regulation is enforced.

 

The enforced Data Privacy Officer – revenue generation for lawyers?

For private legal entities, the obligation set forth in Art. 35 of the regulation to designate a Data Privacy Officer (DPO) only applies to the processing of personal data that affects large amounts of individuals (≥ 5000 data subjects in 12 months) or regular and systematic monitoring of data subjects or the processing of special categories of data, location data or children´s data in large scale filing systems. Read more of this post

European Data Protection Reform – 24 hour disclosure or undue delay?

European Data Protection ReformIf your company touches any Europeans’ data you’d better prepare for what’s coming.


The EU data protection reform is steadily moving forward. On March 12, 2014, the European Parliament adopted the current proposal in its first reading. The new regulation is intended to strengthen consumer privacy rights and to boost Europe’s digital economy. However, many experts across the Atlantic have expressed deep concerns with regard to some controversial aspects of the incoming laws, which introduce bigger fines, 24 hour disclosure and the enforced Data Privacy Officer. The proposed regulation applies to the processing of personal data pertaining to data subjects in the EU even if the controller or processor of such data is not established in the EU. U.S. companies with or without operations in the EU that fail to comply with the new rules can trigger fines up to €100 million. If your company touches any Europeans’ data, you’d better prepare for what’s coming and know what to do to minimize the impact on your organization when the regulation is enforced.

 

24 hour disclosure or undue delay?

The new regulation establishes the consumer right to know when their data has been “hacked”. Companies and organizations must notify the national supervisory authority of serious data breaches as soon as possible, if feasible within 24 hours, so that users can take appropriate measures. Read more of this post

European Data Protection Reform – The 100 Million Euro Fine

European Data Protection ReformIf your company touches any Europeans’ data you’d better prepare for what’s coming.


The EU data protection reform is steadily moving forward. On March 12, 2014, the European Parliament adopted the current proposal in its first reading. The new regulation is intended to strengthen consumer privacy rights and to boost Europe’s digital economy. However, many experts across the Atlantic have expressed deep concerns with regard to some controversial aspects of the incoming laws, which introduce bigger fines, 24 hour disclosure and the enforced Data Privacy Officer. The proposed regulation applies to the processing of personal data pertaining to data subjects in the EU even if the controller or processor of such data is not established in the EU. U.S. companies with or without operations in the EU that fail to comply with the new rules can trigger fines up to €100 million. If your company touches any Europeans’ data, you’d better prepare for what’s coming and know what to do to minimize the impact on your organization when the regulation is enforced.

 

The 100 million euro fine: outrageous sanctions set a disturbing precedent.

Under the current national European data protection laws enacted or amended in the wake of Directive 95/46/EC, administrative fines are rather limited – i.e. in Germany the maximum fine is €300,000 – and rarely imposed at all. The new regulation entails a paradigm change in that it introduces substantial sanctions for non-compliance with the new rules. Read more of this post

The Financial Impact of Consumerization – Does BYOD make business sense?

enterprises-deploy-many-types-of-byod-programs-378x284One of the less understood aspects of Consumerization is its financial impact on the business. Is your BYOD program in the money?


Studies* show that an increasing number of organizations allow their employees to use personal devices to connect to corporate networks and data for work related activities – the so called Bring Your Own Device phenomenon. However, a recent study conducted by Forrester Reserach reveals that only a few companies measure the actual financial impact of this new IT model and that even fewer have a clear sense of whether Consumerization actually makes good business sense.

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